Rare Photos Of Wrigley's Scoreboard Mark Its 100th Anniversary

[A view of the field from inside Wrigley Field's iconic scoreboard during a baseball game between Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago Cubs. With Boston's Fenway Park and Wrigley the only two stadiums in the majors with primary manual scoreboards, it has been a job largely shrouded in mystery until the Cubs allowed The Associated Press climb the steel ladder through the steel floor of the scoreboard for a rare visit to mark Wrigley's 100-year anniversary. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato.]

Rare Photos Of Wrigley's Scoreboard Mark Its 100th Anniversary

[Scoreboard operator Darryl Wilson keeps up with the game as he watches from inside Wrigley Field's iconic scoreboard. Wilson mans the two top floors, little more than scaffolding of the three-level scoreboard, tracking scores from around baseball and changing scores and the uniform numbers of pitchers as managers in those games bring in relievers. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato.]

Rare Photos Of Wrigley's Scoreboard Mark Its 100th Anniversary

[Scoreboard operators Brian Helmus, left, and Fred Washington look out to the field from inside the scoreboard at Wrigley Field during a baseball game between the Pirates and Cubs. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato.]

Rare Photos Of Wrigley's Scoreboard Mark Its 100th Anniversary

[A view from inside the mechanics of the only electronically operated part, built in 1937, of Wrigley Field's scoreboard displays the number of the batter, and the number of balls, strikes and outs , in Chicago. Immediately after every pitch, the inside of the scoreboard fills with what sounds like a thousand angry bees, the result of a finger pressing a button in the press box behind home plate that sends an electrical charge into the panels of half ball-shaped "targets," causing specific ones to flip so that they add up to form the number of the batter, and the number of balls, strikes and outs. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato.]

Rare Photos Of Wrigley's Scoreboard Mark Its 100th Anniversary

[Scoreboard operators Brian Helmus, left, and Fred Washington look out to the field from inside the scoreboard at Wrigley Field. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato.]

Rare Photos Of Wrigley's Scoreboard Mark Its 100th Anniversary

[Rick Fuhs operates a panel full of buttons in the press box behind home plate that sends an electrical charge into a panel of half ball-shaped "targets," causing specific ones to flip so that they add up to form the number of the batter, and the number of balls, strikes and outs on Wrigley Field's scoreboard. This switch box and the only electronically operated part of the display on Wrigley Field's iconic scoreboard were built in 1937 and still being used at the ballpark. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato.]

Rare Photos Of Wrigley's Scoreboard Mark Its 100th Anniversary

[John Weber keeps score with a pencil and scorecard. The 86-year-old retired transit worker figures he is an increasingly rare kind of baseball fan. Between batters and between pitches, most fans in the stands at Wrigley _ and everywhere else in the majors _ take their eyes off the game to peck away at smartphones, not bothering to try to figure out the baseball hieroglyphics that Weber and other purists scrawl on their cards. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato.]

Rare Photos Of Wrigley's Scoreboard Mark Its 100th Anniversary

[Scoreboard operator Darryl Wilson keeps up with the game as he watches from inside Wrigley Field's iconic scoreboard as during a baseball game between Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago Cubs, in Chicago. Wilson mans the two top floors, little more than scaffolding of the three-level scoreboard, tracking scores from around baseball and changing scores and the uniform numbers of pitchers as managers in those games bring in relievers. AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato.]